HOW YOU CAN PROTECT YOUR KIDS FROM REALITY SHOW VIOLENCE

053112-health-watching-tv-self-esteem-children-eating.jpg

 

In trying to decide what steps to take to protect your children from the negative effects of TV violence, it is important to realize that in today's modern culture they will be exposed to a certain amount of this type of programming even if they don't see it at home. So we must adjust ourselves to that reality and figure out what can be done in view of that. We suggest the following:
check

Try and restrict television time to one or two hours per day, however, keep in mind that quantity is not as much an issue as quality. In other words, it's what is watched more than how much is watched that is most important.

check

Preview ahead programs that your kids want to watch and make an informed decision as to whether they are appropriate or not.

check

Substitute your children's favorite videos for network programming. Most kids like to watch favorite videos repeatedly.

check

Frankly discuss any violent content with your children. Be sure that they have a firm grasp on the difference between fantasy and reality. Focus on the suffering caused by violence as opposed to messages that portray violence as acceptable. Research has found that one of the best ways of avoiding the negative effects of TV violence on children is to involve them in discussions about how children can be fooled or hurt by what they see on television.

check

Encourage viewing of pro-social and educational TV programming. Some research suggests that viewing television programs that enhance learning, teach moral lessons, and model caring behavior (such as Mister Rogers' Neighborhood) can be a positive influence.

check

Find alternatives to watching TV. Encourage reading, participation in sports or extracurricular activities, or simply more creative play that occurs when the TV is off.

check

Don't use television as a babysitter. This is sometimes hard, especially for working parents. It's quite tempting to sit kids in front of the TV so you can get dinner on the table, or attend to chores that need to be done, or even have a few moments to yourself. Be sure that the TV viewing is going to be a positive experience for your child no matter what the circumstances.

check

Finally, and this is probably the most important one - you want to be sure that you have a close relationship with your child that is nurturing and caring. You must spend adequate positive time together. Also, take the time to teach the values you want them to internalize. Help them learn to solve problems and conflicts through nonviolent means and effective communication. Children who have strong attachments to their parents, and feel loved and secure in those relationships, are much less likely to be negatively effected by television than those who feel isolated and neglected. Be sure that you are the primary influence in your child's development rather that the TV.

 

SOURCE

Be the first to comment

Please check your e-mail for a link to activate your account.